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  1. #1
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    I don't know why I want to know, I just became curious one day. How much does the Sea Drake weigh? Thankfully I'm not a cat so I should be able to live through this bit of curiocity.

  2. #2
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    In water or out?

    Seriously, the bouyancy effect has a major change.

    But if you are to compare it with Earth standards, you can look at a blue whale. Not quite as long as the Sea Drake is supposed to be, but a lot bulkier. They are typically 70 - 80 feet long (although up to 100&#39, and weigh between 90 and 150 tons.

    I would convert that to metric for you, but it's too early for my brain to function.

  3. #3
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    hmmmmmmm you make a good point Benjamin. I accidentally confused weight and mass when I made my original post.

    It would be nice to know both, but I'm more interested in what I feel like calling its actual weight, which is the weight out of water.

    For those of you who want something to base your guesses, guess-timates and/or estimates (educated or not) off of the largest blue whale ever recorded was a female that weighed between 106 and 112 feet long (I found different lengths on the internet for the longest blue whale on record, all the ones I found fell in that range though). Oddly they had the same scientist estimated weight of roughly 200 tons (they were never actually weighed and no indication is given as to if that is in long or short tons).

    To reiterate and condense the info on blue whales
    Longest on record: between 105 and 112 feet
    Scientist estimate on weight: 200 tons

    So it either weighed roughly 480,000 pounds (Long Tons) -OR- roughly 400,000 pounds (Short Tons)

    1 Short Ton = 2,000 pounds = 907.18 kilograms
    1 Long Ton = 2,400 pounds = 1,016.0 kilograms

  4. #4
    Senior Member RaspK_FOG's Avatar
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    Actually, the short ton (I think it is called non-metric or American/Canadian ton on non-scientific terms, but I am not sure...) is based on the Anglosaxon system, and thus equal to 2.000 pounds (as you can see I am a metric user; thus the original "." instead of the "," in thousands; SI rules!&#33, while the long ton is actually called "metric ton" and based on the metric system; in other words, the metric ton equals 1.000 Kg and the 2.400 pound equivalency is an approximation.

  5. #5
    Junior Member Urban fox's Avatar
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    Heh, It’s big enough to smash whole fleets, that’s all ye really need to know.

    I Personally think the sea drake would be far bigger than any mere whale, Perhaps 200-300 ft long with a eel like body.

  6. #6
    Senior Member RaspK_FOG's Avatar
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    I think that was what was meant: longer and slimmer than a whale.

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