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  1. #1
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    I have a quick idea I wanted to run by you guys. Actually, it`s not my idea
    -- it was taken from the Battletech collectable card game.

    Rather than actually having to keep track of where all military units are at
    any given time, we can assume that much of the military can be sent to
    "Patrol". When invaded, quick patrol units will be able to respond to
    hostile incursions, while slower patrol units will not.

    In order for this to work all all units (or possibly all Armies,
    compromising multiple units) must have a certain assigned Speed or Move or
    Initiative rating. When attacking a realm, only defending units that are
    set specifically to guard the province you are invading (regardless of
    Speed) and units assigned to Patrol that match or exceed your attackers`
    Speed can respond to your attack. All units assigned to Patrol that are
    slower than your attacking units, can not respond.

    In order for this to work, there has to be some balancing factors between a
    unit`s military effectiveness and its Speed. Slower units/armies should
    generally be more powerful, while faster units should be weaker, but more
    versatile.

    There also has to be some reason to attack one province over another, and
    currently there really isn`t one. There`s an easy way out in saying that an
    opponent doesn`t know which provinces are being guarded and which are not;
    but this just unnecessarily adds to a bookkeeping nightmare. I`d rather
    have some provinces actually worth more than others somehow.

    Military movements are more abstract, and there is less realism/simulation
    concerning the strategic movement/deployment of troops. Also there`s not so
    much emphasis on how far a unit can move, what type of terrain is involved,
    or how much it costs to put an army on the march. Most of the
    military-strategic decisions actually become economic-strategic decisions as
    you decide which provinces to guard, and what kind of units to purchase for
    your military.

    This system does provide a greater emphasise on combinations of different
    units, as you will need to balance Speed with overall effectiveness. You
    *could* respond to every single incursion with units of weak Scouts from
    your Patrol area if you really wanted to, but most likely you will also need
    some cavalry and other specialized deployment-units, too.

    For those who like the old system, you could still deploy every single
    defender to guard a specific province if you really wanted to. But you have
    some additional options under this system. Some armies for example, may
    prefer slower, more powerful units to guard the capitol and other key
    provinces. This same army may prefer to invade in full force with slower
    units engaging massive amounts of enemy resistance in full bloody battles.
    Another army, however, might prefer to harass an enemy with faster units
    that can strike at unprotected provinces without worrying about the Patrol
    -- these units wouldn`t do much damage, but they`d be able to get in and get
    out quickly, and over time, they could be a significant threat.

    I`ll post more details later.

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  2. #2
    Site Moderator kgauck's Avatar
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    Its an interesting system, but it implies a high level of command and
    control. Without radio, telegraph, &c, some form of magical communication
    would be neccesary in every unit to get it to operate as you describe.
    Otherwise the only units that would know what was going on would be those
    actually fighting. And they only know what is going on where they are.

    IMC, I keep track of scrying ability as a routine military intelligence
    tool. Communication with the front can be more difficult because as soon as
    you set out with a message, you lose the ability to get information.
    Recently, Hjalmar Helder, the druidical advisor to the king of Stjordvik was
    able to detect a large raiding party approaching Stjordvik. King Varri was
    at Arvaby in Arvaald hunting with Eorl Olfjor. Lord Hjalmar cast Animal
    Messenger and sent a bird to the druidical advisor of Eorl Olfjor. The
    druid took the message to Arvaby, only to find the Eorl and the King on a
    hunt. They were located and the King was given the message of a major
    raiding party on the move. The Eorl offered his assistance and Ylvarrik
    Castle was made an advance headquarters. Troops would be summoned there and
    await further instructions. The local druid sent word of this to Hjalmar.
    King Varri asked the one PC who was with him to gather the rest of the PC`s,
    which took several days. When the PC`s were assembled back at Ylvarrik
    Castle, they found out that Hjalmaar had identified Lofkirdik as the target
    province. The King ordered his assembled army to move to Halmvik in
    Lofkirdik. He sent a rider ahead to alert Eorl Arnora. She was in Scalby
    in Udvika, and the rider had to go there to find her. While the king moved,
    he was out of contact with anyone not travelling with him. Riders could be
    sent to find him on his planned route of march, but should circumstances
    force him to change his route, he would be difficult to locate. Lord
    Hjalmar kept a close eye on the Hofors Pass in the Blood Skull province of
    Vrallik. Hjalmar has been to the place and collected stone from the
    mountains there in order to aid his scrying of the place. He saw a large
    force moving across the pass toward to west, indicating that Hjorvaal was
    the target. Hjalmar can wildshape twice per day, so he changed himself into
    a swift sparrow and shot north looking for King Varri and his army. When he
    found the army, he transformed back into his druidical shape only to find
    out that the King had gone on ahead to Halmvik to see to defences there.
    Some of the PC`s were with Varri, and some were with the army. The army was
    halted and a war council was heald. The PC`s were convinced that the army
    should be re-directed to Hjorvaal. With a little bit of debate, they
    confinced some of the other commanders and the army turned around and made
    for the road to Hjorvaal. A PC rode out to Njalby in Hjorvaal to inform
    Eorl Njall. Hjalmar again adopted a wildshape as a bird again, this time an
    owl, and took off for Varri. Varri and the PC`s were spotted in the hills
    north of Halmvik thanks to an owl`s +8 nighttime spot bonus. Again, Hjalmar
    assumed human shape and informed King Varri of the news. Varri confirmed
    Hjalmar`s new orders to the army, and he and the PC`s set out to find the
    army, mostly just by following what they assumed its route would be.
    Hjalmar, who had no horse (obviously) made his way by foot to Halmvik and
    spent the night in the Eorl`s longhouse. The following day, with Varri and
    all but one of the PC`s with the army, Hjalmar set out on horseback. With
    no Ride skill, he only rode 12 miles in half a day to the sacred circle at
    Lojsthajd. There he scryed again from a blessed spring water pool and
    decided to continue by horse. Hjalmar does have some Handle Animal, and
    could calm his horse by spell if need be, or communicate with it. Hjalmar
    joined the army as it entered Hjorvaal late that same day. The army arrived
    two days later at Njalby and took a much needed rest. Two days later, Eorl
    Olfjor arrived with 32 mounted housecarls who came by way of Halmvik, since
    no one had gotten word to Olfjor that the destination of the army had
    changed. A unit of pikes from Udvika was now more or less irrelevant since
    it was marching in the wrong direction and no one knew how to find it. Well
    they could if they needed too, but with way too much effort. Even if it
    knew where to go, the pikes were a week away. Hjalmar was now without his
    crystal ball, and no sacred spring has been adapted for scrying in Hjorvaal,
    so scrying was not very effective. After this scry, counterspells by a
    hobgoblin shaman kept the Bloodskullers concealed from further scrying.
    From here on out, PC and NPC scouting was required to locate the
    Bloodskullers. The PC`s located the enemy (surprise!) but then had to get
    word back to the army of their scouting report. Only because the army was
    camped at Njalby were they located. Had the army been on the move, it would
    have been difficult to inform them of the scouting report. As it was, the
    army set up an ambush, and fell on the Bloodskullers from two sides.
    Overall, the battle was a victory, and the Bloodskullers withdrew in
    disorder. But a well timed charge by a unit of 80 bugbears broke a unit of
    Rjurik archers and left over 90 of them dead.

    Anyway, the command and control issues here were based on the Scry skill,
    wildshape, and spellcasting of a 6th level druid. Without Lord Hjalmar or
    someone like him, its likely that the Bloodskuller`s raid would have been
    carried off with little resistance, and Njalby would have been put to fire.
    All that would have remained would have been a Rjurik raid into the Barony
    to even the score. Had the strategy of attack been more complicated,
    Hjalmar would have been unable to deal with it. He can scry more or less as
    much as he needs to from his crystal ball in his sanctuary in Ravenroost
    Castle in Hollingholmen, but casting the 4th level Scry spell is challenging
    for Hjalmar, and only possible in the first place because of my alternate
    divine spellcasting system. Archdruid, Herkja Hollenviker, has no scry
    skill ranks and is only 5th level. Only one other character (who shall go
    un-named) has any kind of sophisticated scrying ability in Stjordvik, and
    that character is not an ally of the King. Had Hjalmar decided he needed to
    stay with his crystal ball and all the maps, artifacts, and objects stored
    in his sanctum at Ravenroost, he would have been forced to rely on Animal
    Messengers, riders, or convincing Revered Herkja to wildshape and deliver a
    message. Command and control can be tricky, even with magic and special
    powers.

    Kenneth Gauck
    kgauck@mchsi.com

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  3. #3
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    > Its an interesting system, but it implies a high level of command and
    > control. Without radio, telegraph, &c, some form of magical communication
    > would be neccesary in every unit to get it to operate as you describe.
    > Otherwise the only units that would know what was going on would be those
    > actually fighting. And they only know what is going on where they are.


    I don`t know. I figure the Birthright realms are a pretty small scale, and
    it seems like it doesn`t take more than a few days for a mounted rider to
    get from one side of Rhoesone to the other. I think an active "Patrol"
    mechanic can be used without stretching believability too far... and it
    would cut down a lot on paperwork. (Especially for NPC domains -- you could
    just assume all their Medium and Fast units are on patrol, and all their
    Slow units are in castles.)

    My main problem with this system is justifying why a slower unit would be
    more powerful. With infantry this is fairly easier, but under this system,
    mounted cavalry and knights would have to be less effective than infantry
    and I`m just not sure that`s the case.

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  4. #4
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    On Tue, 29 Oct 2002, D20Modern Moderator wrote:

    > I figure the Birthright realms are a pretty small scale, and it seems
    > like it doesn`t take more than a few days for a mounted rider to get
    > from one side of Rhoesone to the other.

    True. But you need an awful lot of mounted riders going constantly back
    and forth to keep a pair of eyes on every mile of the frontier of the
    whole country, especially in difficult terrain. I figure you`d need at
    least a whole unit per province just to keep a watch on the local border:
    200 men per 30-40 miles is spreading them quite thin; certainly they`d be
    incapable of actually fighting off a serious raid at that density -- the
    best they could do is send for help.

    And what about the Gorgon? Would you allow a single central reserve of
    "patrol" units to effectively defend all of the Gorgon`s Crown, Kiergard,
    Markazor and Mur-Kilad? What this system does is tilt the balance in
    favor of larger realms, since they would no longer need a much larger army
    to effectively defend their much longer borders, which increases the force
    they can afford to amass to attack a single neighbor.

    If I were to change the current province-based patrolling system, I`d be
    more inclined to make it harder to watch the borders, rather than easier.

    > My main problem with this system is justifying why a slower unit would be
    > more powerful. With infantry this is fairly easier, but under this system,
    > mounted cavalry and knights would have to be less effective than infantry
    > and I`m just not sure that`s the case.

    The variable you`re leaving out is price. Knights are both faster and
    stronger than infantry, which should be balanced by making them much more
    expensive.


    Ryan Caveney

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  5. #5
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    > True. But you need an awful lot of mounted riders going constantly back
    > and forth to keep a pair of eyes on every mile of the frontier of the
    > whole country, especially in difficult terrain. I figure you`d need at
    > least a whole unit per province just to keep a watch on the local border:
    > 200 men per 30-40 miles is spreading them quite thin; certainly they`d be
    > incapable of actually fighting off a serious raid at that density -- the
    > best they could do is send for help.

    So? Why not just assume every province has these, either as part of the
    definition of a province, or of its level, or of its law holdings? It would
    be a similiar assumption to that of every province having a certain amount
    of common guards for the streets or tax collectors to collect all the taxes.
    It adds a lot to ease to bookkeeping and it`s not that far a stretch to say
    that if one unit is needed to watch a province, then every province has
    enough watchers to perform its basic function.


    > And what about the Gorgon? Would you allow a single central reserve of
    > "patrol" units to effectively defend all of the Gorgon`s Crown, Kiergard,
    > Markazor and Mur-Kilad?

    I don`t know much about the Gorgon`s Crown, but aren`t these all individual
    realms? And yes, a single unit deticated to patrol would be able to be
    deployed to anywhere that hundreds of slower-moving men are invading -- at
    least in this alternate system. I don`t know if that`s such an advantage
    since the idea is that these faster units will either have to be much more
    expensive or much weaker than slower-moving units.


    >What this system does is tilt the balance in
    > favor of larger realms, since they would no longer need a much larger army
    > to effectively defend their much longer borders, which increases the force
    > they can afford to amass to attack a single neighbor.

    Interesting. I had thought quite the opposite: Since slower units would be
    more powerful (or a lot cheaper), it would be easier for smaller realms like
    Medeore or Endier to buy a bunch of slower units and set them all to guard
    while larger realms like Rhoesone would have to buy weaker or more expensive
    fast units to patrol.

    While its true that larger realms would be easier to defned in this
    alternate system than in the current system, I think this alternate system
    is balanced pretty well within itself.


    > If I were to change the current province-based patrolling system, I`d be
    > more inclined to make it harder to watch the borders, rather than easier.

    Okay, I could understand that. I think this system would have a lot less
    bookkeeping, and still maintain useful war/battle mechanics that provide
    plenty of options. If you`d like, I suppose you could add a somekind of
    patrol check to do it, in addition, perhaps with the DC based on the size of
    the realm, and the modifier based on the realm`s law holdings and military
    set to Patrol. But I don`t think it would be a good idea to discourage the
    use of the Patrol mechanic, or it would kind of defeat the purpose. But I
    think it would help both the players and the DM if the option was available.


    >> My main problem with this system is justifying why a slower unit would be
    >> more powerful. With infantry this is fairly easier, but under this system,
    >> mounted cavalry and knights would have to be less effective than infantry
    >> and I`m just not sure that`s the case.
    >
    > The variable you`re leaving out is price. Knights are both faster and
    > stronger than infantry, which should be balanced by making them much more
    > expensive.

    True, but with the exception of Scouts and possibly Light Cavalry, it still
    seems like all units that would be faster would also be better in battle.
    When I get around to making the new unit types for this alternate system, I
    want 25% of the standard units to be Fast and weak, 25% to be Slow and
    powerful, and 50% to be some medium between the two. Cost will vary in each
    category based on the degree of power/weakness, but generally Fast units
    should be weaker than Slow units.

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  6. #6
    Site Moderator kgauck's Avatar
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    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Lord Rahvin" <lordrahvin@SOFTHOME.NET>
    Sent: Wednesday, October 30, 2002 5:00 PM


    > So? Why not just assume every province has these, either as part of the
    > definition of a province, or of its level, or of its law holdings? It
    would
    > be a similiar assumption to that of every province having a certain amount
    > of common guards for the streets or tax collectors to collect all the
    taxes.

    First of all, such an assumption makes the territorial state more powerful.
    It won`t be long before clever players begin to extend the application of
    this assumption to conflicts with other kinds of holdings. Such an
    extensive bureaucracy is a powerful tool.

    Second, it eliminates the purpose of the fortification, which was to tie
    down enemy troops until a relief column arrived. If you can just summon up
    the troops from afar by use of a patrol function, this roll of the
    fortification is lost. It is reduced to an expensive way to temporarily
    absorb a small part of the army.

    Third, this assumption just ignores the command and control issues raised by
    just assuming they have been resolved. By the way, so does an assumption of
    a street guard or tax collectors. These imply a highly bureaucratic state
    direction legions of civil servants. But even the Romans accepted that the
    frontier either had to be fortified or a reaction zone in place to respond
    to things that they could not prevent.

    Of course one`s own creation need not be bound by such constraints, but
    there are at least three reasons why one should not assume that patroling
    and communicating defenders are an integral part of a province.

    > True, but with the exception of Scouts and possibly Light Cavalry, it
    still
    > seems like all units that would be faster would also be better in battle.

    Based on what evidence? If these troops are meant to reflect real world
    formations, then in fact heavy troops would handily defeat light troops
    every time. The problem that heavy troops present, is that they often are
    incapable of bringing light troops to battle, because they can run away and
    go places the heavy troops have difficulty going. During a battle with
    light troops present, they are nearly always kept in reserve and not
    deployed directly against enemy formations. Speed and power are a trade
    off. Light infantry is faster, but less powerful than heavy infantry.
    Light cavalry is faster, but less powerful than heavy cavalry. We can, as
    Ryan suggests, include the concept of cost. This explains why heavy cavalry
    is both faster and more poweful than heavy infantry. Although it should be
    added that these improved speeds are tactical, not strategic. Over the long
    march, cavalry is no faster than infantry. Likewise troops that are both
    weak and slow (levies) are very cheap.

    Kenneth Gauck
    kgauck@mchsi.com

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  7. #7
    Site Moderator geeman's Avatar
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    At 07:12 AM 10/31/2002 -0600, Kenneth Gauck wrote:

    > > So? Why not just assume every province has these, either as part of the
    > > definition of a province, or of its level, or of its law holdings? It
    > would
    > > be a similiar assumption to that of every province having a certain amount
    > > of common guards for the streets or tax collectors to collect all the
    > taxes.
    >
    >First of all, such an assumption makes the territorial state more powerful.
    >It won`t be long before clever players begin to extend the application of
    >this assumption to conflicts with other kinds of holdings. Such an
    >extensive bureaucracy is a powerful tool.

    Making the province rulers more militarily influential seems like a good
    idea to me. The politics of province rulership have (historically as well
    as in the BR domain rules) a decidedly military slant. Province rulers are
    the military commanders where law holders represent legal/policing, temples
    the religious life, etc. of the provinces. In the present rules the
    military role of provincial rulers is something that really only gets
    reflected by their access to various troop types. Rather a shoddy
    reflection of the province ruler`s role in the military life of his domain.

    Aside from that, however, if the province and holding levels don`t
    represent that bureaucracy/infrastructure then what do they represent? The
    published materials suggest in several places that such a bureaucracy, its
    staff and accoutrement is what the province and holding levels are meant to
    reflect.

    >Second, it eliminates the purpose of the fortification, which was to tie
    >down enemy troops until a relief column arrived. If you can just summon
    >up the troops from afar by use of a patrol function, this roll of the
    >fortification is lost. It is reduced to an expensive way to temporarily
    >absorb a small part of the army.

    The suggested system of patrol and interdiction doesn`t _eliminate_ the
    purpose of fortification. One could still have fortifications and there
    are still good reasons for building them. It just suggests another
    possible use of military units. Given the current rules there is no
    defensive posture for companies of soldiers other than to have them
    garrison a fortification. Some sort of "patrol" function is reasonable, if
    for no other reason than to maintain some verisimilitude. A player could
    very easily say "I`ll send the royal guard to patrol the border" and we
    should have some sort of mechanic to describe what that actually does other
    than just placing them in a particular province at the edge of the domain.

    >Third, this assumption just ignores the command and control issues raised by
    >just assuming they have been resolved.

    It`s an abstracted idea (and in its early stages at that) so I don`t think
    this is really a reason not to adopt such a concept. It`s just another
    issue that one might take into consideration in coming up with the
    system. Since this concept came from a car game we should consider how it
    might fit into the D&D/BR system which means making it interact with
    character in some way. Should command and control issues be handled by the
    relative skills of the regents? Should it be a factor in determining a DC
    for a successful "patrol" check? Sounds like a possible use of the
    "Command" skill or something similar. The BR system of warcards is already
    pretty heavily abstracted, so similarly abstracting issues of command and
    control would seem a reasonable stance.

    Personally, I think a rough system of determining which companies can
    appear in a battle makes some sense. It reflects issues of tactical
    maneuver that is pretty sorely lacking in the BR system of large scale
    combat. Exactly how that should be implemented I`m not sure, but just
    brainstorming a few ideas here... some sort of numerical rating of a
    company`s "initiative modifier" based on its movement and including a few
    modifiers for role or training (scouts or specifically trained "home guard"
    units) makes some sense. The large scale combat system is pretty heavily
    abstracted, so this could be rationalized twenty different ways. The time
    scale of such a battle, for instance, needn`t be defined like the BR battle
    rounds are (5 minutes each) at all, so the "initiative order" of units as
    they appear on the battlefield could represent hours or even days. Using
    such a system one could determine which units can appear on the battlefield
    at what time. Slower units would then have to be "brought up" from the
    rear, and would appear on the battlefield two or more battle rounds after
    faster, more maneuverable units had arrived and could engage in the
    battle. Opposing commanders might be able to use their skills to continue
    the battle or disengage, meaning certain troops with a slower "initiative
    order" might not be able to engage in the battle at all.

    Such a system could be used to reflect a commander of fast, maneuverable or
    otherwise sneaky/specialized troops performing hit and run tactics and
    raids. It could be used to reflect the way troops are brought up in a set
    piece battle. It could be used to interact with the fortification of
    provinces and holdings and add another level of strategy when "buying"
    units of troops because one could specifically buy units with low
    "initiative order" numbers to garrison such strongpoints.

    Gary

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  8. #8
    Site Moderator kgauck's Avatar
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    The issues I have trouble with are those that make
    patroling, an inherently difficult task automatic, as
    well as automatically bringing up a reserve to the
    correct location to fight a battle against an invader.
    Suggesting that a check be added certainly changes the
    mechanic, since it could have a relativly high DC for
    those who think its a difficult thing to do. I oppose
    automatic scouting intelligence for the same reason. A
    scouting check is altogether different.

    I`m not sure that anyone has disputed that provincial
    rulers are military in nature. I rather take that for
    granted. Controlling territory is essentially military,
    even when performed by institutions other than military
    ones.

    As for an assumption of bureaucracy, this is certainly a
    questionable proposition. Clearly the Rjurik and Vos
    have no bureaucracy, so 2/5th`s of the map easily must
    function on some other basis. Whether or not the
    Brecht, Anuirians, and Khinasi have bureaucracies,
    rather than household administrations, is going to be a
    matter of interpretation. My take is that this is one
    of the new movements in government. PC`s establish
    bureaucracies in place of the households. But others
    might see that differently, esp those who see Anuire as
    a Romanesque state.

    Kenneth Gauck
    kgauck@mchsi.com

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  9. #9
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    > The issues I have trouble with are those that make
    > patroling, an inherently difficult task automatic, as
    > well as automatically bringing up a reserve to the
    > correct location to fight a battle against an invader.
    > Suggesting that a check be added certainly changes the
    > mechanic, since it could have a relativly high DC for
    > those who think its a difficult thing to do. I oppose
    > automatic scouting intelligence for the same reason. A
    > scouting check is altogether different.

    Yes, this was an early idea, and only one part of a revised military system.
    The idea is to make the system as playable as possible while keeping with
    certain campaign-specific ideologies. The "ideology" part is going to come
    from a large list of (relatively simple) optional rules that can be added to
    the basic system. To revise the patrol mechanic, I`m thinking of adding
    optional elements requiring checks for successful defense form the patrol,
    requiring fortifications for guarding units, assigning stealth ratings or
    using domain actions to provide units ways to avoid patrols, to limit the
    amount of patrol units that can be sent to a specific incursion based on
    infrastructure and terrain, adjust patrol attempts based on size of realm,
    have astract attack forms (Harass) in addition to abstract defense forms
    (Patrol), and otherwise making Terrain and possibly Technology relavent to
    the deployment of military troops, and to provide other types of military
    operations that can be done in addition to invasions and occupations.

    I want this system to be easily playable military system for running "To
    Each His Throne"-type games, providing an emphasis on "playability" with
    added optional rules to provide greater "realism". So whenever possible,
    I`ve tried to make actions automatic or abstracted, and when its possible to
    provide greater detail or strategy I`ve tried to make it a fairly modular
    (easily removeable or changeable) optional rule.

    I admit that the system as it stands now is very abstract and still in early
    stages of design, but I would appreciate any rules/ideas you can contribute
    that would help flesh it out.


    > As for an assumption of bureaucracy, this is certainly a
    > questionable proposition. Clearly the Rjurik and Vos
    > have no bureaucracy, so 2/5th`s of the map easily must
    > function on some other basis. Whether or not the
    > Brecht, Anuirians, and Khinasi have bureaucracies,
    > rather than household administrations, is going to be a
    > matter of interpretation. My take is that this is one
    > of the new movements in government. PC`s establish
    > bureaucracies in place of the households. But others
    > might see that differently, esp those who see Anuire as
    > a Romanesque state.

    I was primarily interested in Anuire, as most of my BR experience comes from
    the Southern Coast. I hadn`t yet thought of the Brecht or Rjurik areas yet
    -- but game mechanically they aren`t much different as they stand now.
    Rjurik and Vos still have province levels, law holdings, temple holdings,
    roads, trade routes, etc. Are you sure the rules regarding the methods in
    which they attack or defend with their military should be different from
    Anuire or Khinasi? Maybe their differences could simply be reflected by
    having different types of military units with different scores and Speed
    ratings.

    (Upon reflection, the regions of Vosgaard and Rjurik actually seem more
    likely to use the Patrol method rather than the Guarding method.)


    -------

    Does the addition of a "Patrol check" to determine whether an incursion can
    be defended with "patrol reserves" or to determine how many units can defend
    against the incursion alleviate your concerns about the system?


    -Lord Rahvin

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  10. #10
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    Just a thought: perhaps a unit on "Patrol" might require (slightly?)
    increased maintenance costs, since they are putting wear on their boots,
    uniforms and saddle gear; dragging rations around with them, and so forth,
    rather than sitting about the castle.

    Lee.

    In a message dated 10/30/02 8:05:41 PM Eastern Standard Time,
    lordrahvin@SOFTHOME.NET writes:

    << > If I were to change the current province-based patrolling system, I`d be
    > more inclined to make it harder to watch the borders, rather than easier.

    Okay, I could understand that. I think this system would have a lot less
    bookkeeping, and still maintain useful war/battle mechanics that provide
    plenty of options. If you`d like, I suppose you could add a somekind of
    patrol check to do it, in addition, perhaps with the DC based on the size of
    the realm, and the modifier based on the realm`s law holdings and military
    set to Patrol. But I don`t think it would be a good idea to discourage the
    use of the Patrol mechanic, or it would kind of defeat the purpose. But I
    think it would help both the players and the DM if the option was available.
    >>

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