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Thread: Contest

  1. #1
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    Contest

    I am trying to create a system for contesting holdings based on the fourth edition combat system and want to share and exchange progress with the B-right community.


    In my view contest should be much like regular combat with multiple actors using their holdings as weapons to strike at each other’s powerbases.


    Edit.

    Holding HP:

    10/ level, if a holding is reduced to 0 HP it loses one level.

    Holding damage:

    Small holding, level 0-3: 1d4
    Medium holding, level 4-6: 1d6
    Large holding, level 7-8: 1d8
    Huge holding, level 9-10: 1d10
    Last edited by Sir Tiamat; 05-04-2009 at 03:08 AM.

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    Contest initiative

    Before the first round of contest, you roll initiative, which is similar to normal initiative except it is a "responsiveness" check. Regents act in initiative order as per the PHB. The initiative order remains the same from round to round, although a contestant’s position in the order can change after delaying or readying.

    ROLLING INITIATIVE
    To determine a contest’s initiative order,
    roll initiative. To do so, make a Responsiveness check.
    Roll 1d20 and add the following:

    ✦ One-half your level
    ✦ Your Responsiveness modifier
    ✦ Any bonuses or penalties that apply

    The result is your initiative for this contest. When combatants have the same initiative, the combatant with the higher initiative bonus (the total of one-half your level, your Responsiveness modifier, and any bonuses) goes before the other. If their bonuses are the same, they can roll a die or flip a coin to break the tie.

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    Contest actions

    A contest round, like standard DnD combat is made up of actions. Agitating the populace,
    Raiding a holding, bribing and official, casting a realm spell—each of these activities, along with many others, is considered an action. You use different action types to do different things. For example, most attack powers are standard actions, and activating your holdings is normally an activate action. (A few powers may not require an action to use.)


    THE MAIN ACTION TYPES
    Standard Action: Like in regular combat, standard actions are the core of domain combat, or contest. You can normally take one standard action on your turn. Examples: contest powers.
    Activate Action: Activate actions involve movement of the regent or lieutenant to a friendly holding in order to activate this holding. This activated holding can thereafter be used as a tool/ weapon to perform standard actions, and will remain activated until another holding is activated. (Note that most powers require a specific type of holding to be activated, whereas some powers require the court holding to be activated) Examples: activate holding, activate court holding, and relocate court.
    Minor Action: Minor actions are enabling actions, simple actions that usually lead to more exciting actions. You can normally take them only on your turn. Examples:.
    Free Action: Free actions take almost no time or effort. You can take as many free actions as you want during your or another contestant’s turn. The DM can restrict the number of free actions in a turn.
    Examples: sending messages.

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    Contest attacks

    Contest attacks in BIRTHRIGHT take many forms. A warlord's law holding raids a temple. A guilder uses his shady contacts within a guild to assassinate a distant target. A Bishop’s temples agitate against a lord across the land. An Archmage creates a plague, targeting several provinces. These examples illustrate the four attack types: holding, distant, realm, and region.

    Holding Attack
    A holding attack usually uses an activated holding and targets one other holding within the same province. Some powers allow you to make multiple holding attacks, against either multiple rival holdings or a single rival holding.

    HOLDING ATTACK
    ✦ Targeted: Holding attacks target individual holdings. A holding attack against multiple holdings consists of separate attacks, each with its own attack roll and damage roll.
    Range: A holding attack’s range generally does not go beyond the province borders.


    Distant Attack
    A distant attack is a strike against a distant target. A distant attack usually targets one holding within its range.

    DISTANT ATTACK
    ✦ Targeted: Distant attacks use the activated holding to target single rival holdings outside the province. A distant attack against multiple rival holdings consists of separate attacks, each with its own attack roll and damage roll.
    Range: Some powers set a specific range (“Distant 2 provinces”) or allow you to attack any target you can see (“Distant sight”).
    Long Range: (perhaps with certain powers)
    ✦ Provoke Opportunity Attacks: If you use a distant power with a holding that is in the same province as an activated rival holding, that rival can make an opportunity attack against you.


    Realm Attack
    A realm attack targets a rival holdings over multiple provinces in which you have a holdings. It is a coordinated attack from several of holdings against rival holdings. Often these attacks are specifically aimed at a single rival or single type of holding. Some realm attacks require the court holding to be activated holding.

    REALM ATTACK
    ✦ Area of Effect: A realm attack creates an area of effect consisting of multiple provinces. It is similar to a burst in that it allows you to make an attack with your activated holding in the origin province and with your holdings in all directions to a specified number of provinces from the origin province. A realm attack’s area of effect and targets are specified in its power description.
    ✦ Multiple Attack Rolls but One Damage Roll:
    When you make a realm attack, each of your specified holdings within the area of effect can make a separate attack roll against each target within its province. However, you make a single damage roll that affects all the targets.

    Region Attack
    Region attacks are similar to realm attacks, except that only the activated holding is used to make attacks. These attacks can even target provinces within the area of effect in which you have no holdings. Often these attacks are specifically aimed at a single rival or single type of holding. Some realm attacks require the court holding to be activated holding.

    REGION ATTACK
    ✦ Area of Effect: A region attack creates an area of effect of multiple provinces, originating in the activated holding’s province and extending in all directions to a specified number of provinces from the origin province.. A region attack affects certain targets within its area of effect, which has a certain size. An area attack’s area of effect and targets are specified in its power description. (Some region attacks allow you to choose which holdings or provinces within the area of effect are affected.)
    ✦ Origin province: The activated holding unless otherwise specified.
    ✦ Multiple Attack Rolls but One Damage Roll:
    When you make an region attack, you make a separate attack roll against each target in the area of effect, using the single activated holding. However, you make a single damage roll that affects all the target holdings.
    ✦ Provoke Opportunity Attacks: If you use a region power with a holding that is in the same province as an activated rival holding, that rival can make an opportunity attack against you.

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    I would rather call them Actions. I don't like talking about domain level actions as "attacks." Many of them are not, and even Contestation can take forms that are not directly hostile, such as negotiations, acquiring new sources of production, lowering prices, charity programs, etc.

  6. #6
    Under initiative, what bonus/penalties would apply for this? Do you mean feats that would give you bonus' in regular combat (improved initiative, quick draw, etc.)? Though if that is what you are talking about, it doesn't make that much sense for some of them as applied to domain actions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowbite View Post
    Under initiative, what bonus/penalties would apply for this? Do you mean feats that would give you bonus' in regular combat (improved initiative, quick draw, etc.)? Though if that is what you are talking about, it doesn't make that much sense for some of them as applied to domain actions.
    I have not yet considered the bonuses or penalties. I was thinking along the lines of roleplaying bonuses/ penalties, so that actions taken in character may effect the domain level of play. I would not apply character feats such as imp. initiative, but I do not want to rule out that a similar feat for the domain level would apply.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    I would rather call them Actions. I don't like talking about domain level actions as "attacks." Many of them are not, and even Contestation can take forms that are not directly hostile, such as negotiations, acquiring new sources of production, lowering prices, charity programs, etc.
    At the moment I intend to use a skill-based system for most domain level actions. Domain attacks only apply to hostile actions that target rival holdings in order to reduce their level or effectiveness.

    That said, perhaps attacks is not the best term for contest actions and I will look whether I can find a better term. For now see attacks as a working term, untill we can come up with a better term.

  9. #9
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    example power



    Arrest guild members (Lord Attack 2)
    Armed guards crack down on common guild members in an attempt to disrupt guild activity.

    Seasonal ✦ Martial, Law holding
    Standard Action Holding attack
    Requirement: You must have an active Law holding.
    Target: An enemy guild holding.
    Attack: Force vs. …

    Hit: 2[Holding] + Force modifier damage, and the target holding generates 1 less GB next season.

  10. #10
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    Sir Tiamat, I think you have some very interesting ideas here. I haven't got the time at the moment to really pick it apart and give you any good feedback as I am concentrating on the adventuring side of 4e conversion at the moment. Keep up the good work though.

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