Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Ber Falaïa

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Site Moderator Sorontar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    4,121
    Downloads
    55
    Uploads
    1

    Ber Falaïa

    Discussion thread for Ber Falaïa. If you would like to add a comment, click the Post Reply button.

  2. #2
    Site Moderator Sorontar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    4,121
    Downloads
    55
    Uploads
    1

    lexical query

    "a sudan province"? Is that a typo or does it have a meaning that I am not aware of?

    Note that according to sudan. (n.d.). Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved July 23, 2008, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/sudan

    1842, from Arabic Bilad-al-sudan, lit. "country of the blacks," from sud, pl. of aswad (fem. sauda) "black."

    But I don't think you are meaning a "black province".

    Sorontar

  3. #3
    Site Moderator kgauck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Springfield Mo
    Posts
    3,562
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0
    It refers to the type of climate between Sahel and Savanna. The origin of the term is as you suggest, but has long since also described the conditions of Africa from Mali to the Sudan (country) between the Sahara and Sahel to the north and the wetter Savanna to the south. Savanna makes good farmland, and are grasslands with scattered trees, which lie between forest regions and grassland regions.

    The Khinasi book describes the Plains States as the driest part of Cerilia, but nowhere near as arid as true desert. On the other hand, the authors of Khourane could only think of two warm weather climates (jungle and desert) and three kinds of topography. Placing a ring of jungle around a pocket of desert indicates either some very precise rainfall, or a poor choice of biomic terms. So I chose to start with jungle in the Docandragh as indicated, then shift to a forest-savanna mosaic , where forest betweens to give way to more open land, a savanna, where proper farming could be productive and grass and trees still intermix, and the sudan as a drier grassland where farmland would be marginal at best and herding would be more appropriate.

    Since there are only three places where you can transition directly from jungle to desert (Africa going north and south, Australia from the northern tropical coast to the outback, and Central America from Yucatan to central Mexico) any names I selected tended to either be obscure or culturally inappropriate (the Tarvan Wastes as outback?). In Mexico appropriate regions include Zacatonal and perhaps Tamaulipan matorral. These seemed no less obscure and very Spanish.

    I can use culturally neutral terms, but those tend to just group adjectives onto a base noun. Semi-arid grassland, for instance. If you like semi-arid grassland, I can go that way in place of sudan, if you think it will be clearer. My concern was that it sounds like what it is, a modern technical term rather than the kind of term the Khinasi would use to describe their land. The other alternative is to poke around mideastern climate for something that suggests semi arid grasslands and hope that it likewise doesn't confuse.

  4. #4
    Site Moderator Sorontar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    4,121
    Downloads
    55
    Uploads
    1
    I gather from what you have said that there is not an existing climatic term "sudan", and that you have just done is used the country's name as a common noun to describe a common biomic found there. If so, then this is very hard for others to understand. I would use Sudan-like (and link to Wikipedia:Sudan) or another term.

    It certainly looks like you are trying to describe a dry savanna or grassland.

    My main "reference" here has been http://www.answers.com/topic/grassland which is pinching stuff from Wikipedia etc.

    Perhaps steppe (http://www.answers.com/topic/steppe):
    A vast semiarid grass-covered plain, as found in southeast Europe, Siberia, and central North America.

    Or desert grassland or xeric grassland?

    Sorontar, who is not in any way a geographer

  5. #5
    Site Moderator kgauck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Springfield Mo
    Posts
    3,562
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0
    Sudan is a region,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudan_(region), and the description is climactic, not cultural or ethnic.

    Steppe the best agricultural land on the planet. It is characterized by deep, rich soils, because grass produces more biomass faster than any other biome. Its a breadbasket biome. The Heartlands of Anuire is steppe, similar to southeast Europe and central North America.

    Xeric grasslands are too dry. I was looking for the zone between xeric grasslands and steppes.

  6. #6
    Site Moderator kgauck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Springfield Mo
    Posts
    3,562
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0
    I could actually take a place name and call it a climate, using say, SÚtif. Its in Algeria between the Mediteranean and Sahara zones, with seasonal grazing grounds to seminomadic sheep herders.

    Its got a nice Arabic name. Otherwise still looking.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    883
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    kgauck schrieb:
    > This post was generated by the Birthright.net message forum.
    > You can view the entire thread at:
    > http://www.birthright.net/forums/showthread.php?goto=newpost&t=4447
    > ...
    > Unlike an orchard, one finds where Europe ends by consulting an atlas, not by looking out the window.
    >
    Actually where Europe ends has often changed and was controversial -
    look only at this map with various eastern borders of "Europe":
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bild:Europa_geografisch_karte_de_1.png

  8. #8
    Special Guest (Donor)
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Posts
    417
    Downloads
    25
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ConjurerDragon View Post
    Actually where Europe ends has often changed and was controversial -
    look only at this map with various eastern borders of "Europe":
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bild:Eu...karte_de_1.png
    According to ULEB and UEFA, Israel is in Europe, too.
    Rey M. - court wizard of Tuarhievel

  9. #9
    Site Moderator kgauck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Springfield Mo
    Posts
    3,562
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0
    So, ConjurerDragon, when Sorontar posted a citation from ask.com, I should have used a historic definition of Europe and ignored the clear meaning of what he was saying?

    Perhaps you and Rey would prefer to pick and choose the meanings you want rather than the ones most likely to be understood because they are the commonly agreed to.

    When someone posts something like:
    Quote Originally Posted by Sorontar View Post
    Perhaps steppe (http://www.answers.com/topic/steppe):
    A vast semiarid grass-covered plain, as found in southeast Europe, Siberia, and central North America.
    ...I should go find a historical definition of Europe that makes this statement meaningless? And further, I should change the issue from where the grass is to instead where Europe is?

    I'm afraid I view the point of communication to be a clear understanding of what the other fellow is saying, not to redefine his sense to mean what I would prefer it to mean. That, my friend, is the road to confusion.

    I know quite a bit about geography, and one of the things I know is what constitutes irrelevant additional information.

    Now I suppose I should expect someone who thinks they are informing me that North America has no steppe, but instead has prairie (the difference being the height of the grass).

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
BIRTHRIGHT, DUNGEONS & DRAGONS, D&D, the BIRTHRIGHT logo, and the D&D logo are trademarks owned by Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and are used by permission. ę2002-2010 Wizards of the Coast, Inc.