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  1. #1
    Site Moderator Sorontar's Avatar
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    Cerilian bagpipes

    Cultural question for you. Which Cerilian cultures/races would you think plays the bagpipes?

    Canon says the Rjurik do (http://www.birthright.net/forums/sho...ry_Rjurik_NPCs) but there are many types of bagpipes - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagpipes

    Would you think that they would have different cultural functions - romantic serenades, instrument of war, managing wildlife, terraforming, etc?

    Sorontar, who once had a satyr bard who played the bagpipes in a non-Birthright game

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorontar View Post
    Cultural question for you. Which Cerilian cultures/races would you think plays the bagpipes?

    Canon says the Rjurik do (http://www.birthright.net/forums/sho...ry_Rjurik_NPCs) but there are many types of bagpipes - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagpipes

    Would you think that they would have different cultural functions - romantic serenades, instrument of war, managing wildlife, terraforming, etc?

    Sorontar, who once had a satyr bard who played the bagpipes in a non-Birthright game
    Interesting question. Based on that wikipedia article, you could make a case for bagpipes in all the regions of Cerilia. Celtic/Scottish - Rjurik. Germany - Brechtur, Lithuanea / Estonia - Vosgaard, Portugal / Moors - Khinasi. And their exitence in Anuire could be justified by imports from the old empire. For me, i'd probably only keep them common in Rjurik, and maybe some outliers of Brechtur and Vosgaard.

    Usage: in Rjurik, for every purpose that the Scottish traditions currently use. In Vosgaard, i only see them as being used for war... not sure why.

    I don't see elves with bagpipes... the sound doesn't seem to fit with their culture, in my mind. But bagpipes seem like a natural fit for the dwarves. I wonder if halflings like bagpipes... heh.

    Of course, even if bagpipes are found throughout all the cultures, that doesn't mean they have to all sound the same.


    -Fizz
    Last edited by Fizz; 09-14-2021 at 04:25 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Osprey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorontar View Post
    Cultural question for you. Which Cerilian cultures/races would you think plays the bagpipes?

    Canon says the Rjurik do (http://www.birthright.net/forums/sho...ry_Rjurik_NPCs) but there are many types of bagpipes - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagpipes

    Would you think that they would have different cultural functions - romantic serenades, instrument of war, managing wildlife, terraforming, etc?

    Sorontar, who once had a satyr bard who played the bagpipes in a non-Birthright game
    It's a little sad that Rjurik bards get typecast as skalds - who are typically orators but not musicians (as I understand). Skalds are neat but seem very narrow in traditional focus.

    You can always have Rjurik bards trained in spellsong other ways though. Foreign bards of course...and the elves.

    One story could be that the elves of Coullabhie are training young Rjurik pipers in spellsong and other elven ways - then sending them back out into the tribes and kingdoms of Rjurik to sow chaos and discord as their spellsong pipes clash and challenge the skaldic traditions.

    Let the Bard Wars begin!

  4. #4
    One may say that the bagpipe is linked to certain communities, more than a single culture.
    Take for example the italian Zampognahttps://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zampogna. It is a typical instrument found in mountain communities, the zampognaro is a sheperd who plays this folk instrument mostly on christmas time, by travelling through small towns. It is similar - but not the same thing - as a bagpipe. So any culture, in principle may have their own version of the bagpipe, while not having the scottish bagpipe.

  5. #5
    Site Moderator Sorontar's Avatar
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    Thanks Witness . Here is the English wikipedia link - https://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zampogna

    Sorontar

  6. #6
    Depending on the timeperiod almost every region in Europe had a form of bagpipes. In Hainaut and the neighbouring areas in northern France the Muchosa was played from certainly the 13th century on.

    As Anuire is part sourced on that area as well, no reason not to import it.

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