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  1. #1
    Niels E. Wisth
    Guest

    Birthright and realism (was: th

    > Ohh, you said, i fully agree. Now, it's not perfect, anyway, did you
    >found some great politically, socially, historically or economically bug
    in
    >the setting ? I ask to you cause you seem to be interested in those
    >aspect and therefore i think you can know something i not.
    >Nadastor, nadastor@mail5.clio.it

    I'm sorry, but I haven't sat down to examine the setting _that_ closely
    yet... I've only gamemastered Birthright on two occations, spending most of
    my GM time on my Forgotten Realms campaign (I am a _player_ in a BR
    campaign, though).
    My point in my last post is that Birthright supplements give the overall
    structure of things - of culture, politics, social life, history and
    economics - in stead of details like who lives in house #273 on the map of
    Arabel, and what levels they are.
    The geography makes more sense (no huge magical deserts or glaciers), and
    the people actually seem to have logical ways to live off the land.
    The religion includes the basis of a mythology, from which a GM can
    develop stories to suit his campaign (but a "Mythologies of Cerilia"-book,
    including different stories from different churches, would not be such a
    bad idea, Rich! The multitudes of churches need some hard facts to disagree
    about! :) )
    Birthright is a more GM-friendly setting, because researching realistic
    cultural, social, political and economical traits - in a setting where you
    already know who lives in every house - is a heck of a job.
    I believe that if you want to get the full treat out of playing
    Birthright, go to your local library and borrow some books about
    renaissance Europe (for Anuire), medieval Middle-East (for Khinasi), the
    Hansa league (for Brecht), the Celts and the Vikings (for Rjurik), and
    medieval Russia and the Mongols (for the Vos). Since most realms in both
    Khinasi and Anuire tend to stick to a monolathric (one god is OURS, but ok,
    the others exist) religion, you can use many cultural aspects based on both
    christianity and islam. MUCH easier than trying to put a score of different
    gods from a score of different earth cultures into one medieval-ish fantasy
    realm... ;)


    - --
    Niels E. Wisth - Nudis Verbis

  2. #2
    Matthew M. Colville
    Guest

    Birthright and realism (was: th

    > Birthright is a more GM-friendly setting, because researching realistic
    >cultural, social, political and economical traits - in a setting where you
    >already know who lives in every house - is a heck of a job.
    > I believe that if you want to get the full treat out of playing
    >Birthright, go to your local library and borrow some books about
    >renaissance Europe (for Anuire), medieval Middle-East (for Khinasi), the
    >Hansa league (for Brecht), the Celts and the Vikings (for Rjurik), and
    >medieval Russia and the Mongols (for the Vos). Since most realms in both
    >Khinasi and Anuire tend to stick to a monolathric (one god is OURS, but ok,
    >the others exist) religion, you can use many cultural aspects based on both
    >christianity and islam. MUCH easier than trying to put a score of different
    >gods from a score of different earth cultures into one medieval-ish fantasy
    >realm... ;)

    You're absolutely right. The Forgotten Realms seems 'amalgamted'
    from many different people's ideas. It does not seem like an actual world,
    but a fantasy setting. Cerilia seems, to me, much more realistic.

    - ---------------------- ---------------------------
    Matthew M. Colville. Armed only with wisdom
    mcolville@earthlink.net The Shintao Monks fight against the
    darkness. . .
    Role-Playing and Fiction
    http://www.earthlink.net/~mcolville

  3. #3
    TSRTed@aol.co
    Guest

    Birthright and realism (was: th

    We've tried to make BR as realistic as possible, cutting "realism" corners
    only when they get in the way of interesting and easy game play. We hoped
    that DMs interested in more realism would be able to supply those elements
    themselves, from the basis we set up in the game world and the rules.

    Ed S.

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