Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    johnpost@umich.ed
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    GURPS Mass Combat system is what I use. It is available in the
    Compendium II rules book, a general guide for GMs. Most of the
    other books which include the Mass Combat system are out of print.

    johnpost@umich.edu

    On Wed, 28 May 1997 13:21:21 trustno1@atcon.com (L.Willett) wrote:

    > I use GURPS's mass combat system. It uses a single roll to determine
    >the
    >outcome of the battle, and takes quite a bit into consideration; its
    >not a
    >good as fighting out the whole battle with Gygax's Chainmail rules
    >(anyone
    >else remember this one?), or some other minature wargame rules, or of
    >coursse the war cards stuff; but its fairly fast and accurate, great
    >for BR,
    > One of the best things about it is that it allows for individual
    >characters to influence the outcome (and risk their necks in the
    >process);
    >be they just heroic soldiers on the front line, or a great strategist,
    >or a
    >spell user.
    > I'd recommend to anyone interested to check it out (you'd have to find
    >a
    >GURPS supplement, like Gurps Conan or Horseclans, as the mass combat
    >rules
    >arn't in the main rule book, but maybe they are in the latest
    >edition...).
    >
    > Is anyone else using them ?
    > If so write me privately, I'd like to share modifications.
    >
    >
    > Someone (a ways back) was talking about the size of battles. Here's
    >some
    >data on Agincourt (a definitive battle of european history, fyi), 25
    >October 1415.
    > England's, 27 year old, king Henry V, had 25 to 30 archer units, and 5
    >infantry (or irregular) units under his command. With the advantages
    >of
    >terrain & weather and lots of other stuff deserving the discussions of
    >an
    >entire mailing list itself, he was able to defeat the following french
    >forces.
    > Figures on the french vary greatly (from 50 to _1,000_ units!)
    >depending
    >on the author. A well argued amount of 75 units is generally accepted
    >in
    >some circles.
    > 5 knights (or possibly cavalry)
    > 40 crossbowmen units
    > 30 infantry units
    >[figures taken from - 'The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt,
    >Waterloo
    >and the Somme', John Keegan, Penguin Books, '76]
    >
    >
    >************************************************* **********************
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    >line
    >'unsubscribe birthright' as the body of the message.

  2. #2
    Cec Stacey
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    > Someone (a ways back) was talking about the size of battles. Here's
    some
    > data on Agincourt (a definitive battle of european history, fyi), 25
    > October 1415.
    > England's, 27 year old, king Henry V, had 25 to 30 archer units, and 5
    > infantry (or irregular) units under his command. With the advantages of
    > terrain & weather and lots of other stuff deserving the discussions of an
    > entire mailing list itself, he was able to defeat the following french
    forces.
    > Figures on the french vary greatly (from 50 to _1,000_ units!) depending
    > on the author. A well argued amount of 75 units is generally accepted in
    > some circles.
    > 5 knights (or possibly cavalry)
    > 40 crossbowmen units
    > 30 infantry units
    > [figures taken from - 'The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo
    > and the Somme', John Keegan, Penguin Books, '76]
    >
    >
    > How large was a "unit"? (BTW, it was me talking about the HUGE battles
    we were having!)

  3. #3
    dsbrown@is2.dal.c
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    > > England's, 27 year old, king Henry V, had 25 to 30 archer units, and 5
    > > infantry (or irregular) units under his command. With the advantages of
    > > terrain & weather and lots of other stuff deserving the discussions of an
    > > entire mailing list itself, he was able to defeat the following french forces.
    > > Figures on the french vary greatly (from 50 to _1,000_ units!) depending
    > > on the author. A well argued amount of 75 units is generally accepted in
    > > some circles.
    > > 5 knights (or possibly cavalry)
    > > 40 crossbowmen units
    > > 30 infantry units
    > > [figures taken from - 'The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo
    > > and the Somme', John Keegan, Penguin Books, '76]
    >
    > I'm not sure the battle involved 70-75,000 men on the English side,
    > and 150,000 on the French. Are you sure of the maths there?
    >
    English 30 units *200 men/unit= 6000 men
    French= 75 units*200 men/unit=15000 men

  4. #4
    johnpost@umich.ed
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    On Thu, 29 May 1997 15:48:01 GMT RickardsJ@cardiff.ac.uk (JOHN RICKARDS)
    wrote:

    >
    >> England's, 27 year old, king Henry V, had 25 to 30 archer units, and
    >5
    >> infantry (or irregular) units under his command. With the advantages
    >of
    >> terrain & weather and lots of other stuff deserving the discussions
    >of an
    >> entire mailing list itself, he was able to defeat the following
    >french forces.
    >> Figures on the french vary greatly (from 50 to _1,000_ units!)
    >depending
    >> on the author. A well argued amount of 75 units is generally
    >accepted in
    >> some circles.
    >> 5 knights (or possibly cavalry)
    >> 40 crossbowmen units
    >> 30 infantry units
    >> [figures taken from - 'The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt,
    >Waterloo
    >> and the Somme', John Keegan, Penguin Books, '76]
    >


    >I'm not sure the battle involved 70-75,000 men on the English side,
    >and 150,000 on the French. Are you sure of the maths there?
    >
    >John Rickards
    >

    Are you sure of your math?? Last I knew 30-35 English Units is
    30*200=6,000
    35*200=7,000. French estimates are 75 units or 75*200=15,000. An
    infantry
    unit, a company is omposed of around 200 troops. Cavalry is usually a
    lot
    less, two hundred knights don't tend to travel around together. Knights
    are a stong willed lot and like to do their own thing, plus commanders
    like them to be in smaller more manageable numbers.

    John Post

  5. #5
    Brian Stoner
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    At 06:27 AM 5/29/97 -0300, you wrote:
    >
    >
    >> > How large was a "unit"? (BTW, it was me talking about the HUGE battles
    >> >we were having!)
    >>
    >> Suppose I should of included that...
    >> I used the standard 200 soldiers per unit scale.
    >>
    >> How big were the battles you were having ?
    >>
    >

  6. #6
    Robert Ripley
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    Cec Stacey wrote:

    > > > How large was a "unit"? (BTW, it was me talking about the HUGE
    > battles
    > > >we were having!)
    > >
    > > Suppose I should of included that...
    > > I used the standard 200 soldiers per unit scale.
    > >
    > > How big were the battles you were having ?
    > >
    > -
    >

  7. #7
    JOHN RICKARDS
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    > >I'm not sure the battle involved 70-75,000 men on the English side,
    > >and 150,000 on the French. Are you sure of the maths there?
    > >
    > >John Rickards
    > >
    >
    > Are you sure of your math?? Last I knew 30-35 English Units is
    > 30*200=6,000
    > 35*200=7,000. French estimates are 75 units or 75*200=15,000. An
    > infantry
    > unit, a company is omposed of around 200 troops. Cavalry is usually a
    > lot
    > less, two hundred knights don't tend to travel around together. Knights
    > are a stong willed lot and like to do their own thing, plus commanders
    > like them to be in smaller more manageable numbers.

    Yeah, I realised I'd worked that out wrong on my way home just after
    sending it. Guess that's me flunked my maths exam this summer then.

    ;-)


    John Rickards

    "He who is looking for something has lost something."
    "And he who is not looking?"
    "He gets run over."



    PS. Dan. Hahahahaha.

  8. #8
    Darkstar
    Guest

    Alternate Battle Resolution Rul

    > From: JOHN RICKARDS

    > > England's, 27 year old, king Henry V, had 25 to 30 archer units, and 5
    > > infantry (or irregular) units under his command. With the advantages
    of
    > > terrain & weather and lots of other stuff deserving the discussions of
    an
    > > entire mailing list itself, he was able to defeat the following french
    forces.
    > > Figures on the french vary greatly (from 50 to _1,000_ units!)
    depending
    > > on the author. A well argued amount of 75 units is generally accepted
    in
    > > some circles.
    > > 5 knights (or possibly cavalry)
    > > 40 crossbowmen units
    > > 30 infantry units
    > > [figures taken from - 'The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt,
    Waterloo
    > > and the Somme', John Keegan, Penguin Books, '76]
    >
    > I'm not sure the battle involved 70-75,000 men on the English side,
    > and 150,000 on the French. Are you sure of the maths there?

    In the battle of Agincourt there were 6,000 English soldier and about
    18,000 French, so still a far few soldiers. Comparing it to Birthright that
    would mean about 30 units of Engish soldier and 90 French unit, based on
    200/unit.

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