View Poll Results: what do you require to make clinker built ships?

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  • A shipyard?

    2 22.22%
  • A port?

    2 22.22%
  • Nothing?

    1 11.11%
  • A province of a certain size?

    3 33.33%
  • Other?

    1 11.11%
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
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    lets see if this gets us back to what I was trying to bring up.
    MORNINGSTAR

  2. #2
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    What's a clinker built ship, and can you state which ones from the BRCS would fall under this category.
    Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a night. Set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Osprey's Avatar
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    Scale is unclear. Are you proposing that clinker-built ships of any size should not require a shipyard? It's one thing to say that small fishing ships, even coasters and keelboats, could be built without formal shipyard facilities. But as I understand it, most medieval European ships were clinker-built - so this would include not only longships and knarrs, but probably drakkars, cogs, and caravels too. Likely the roundship(?), galleon, and Khinasi ships are the only non-clinker ships out of the standard BR ship list (I don't know a whole lot about how dhouras, dhows, and zebecs were made IRL, I'm just assuming they weren't clinker-built).

  4. #4
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    I can confirm that the Cog had a clinker hull.
    "It may be better to be a live jackal than a dead lion, but it is better still to be a live lion -- and usually easier."

    - R. A. Heinlien, from The Collected works of Lazarus Long

  5. #5
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    Scale is unclear. Are you proposing that clinker-built ships of any size should not require a shipyard? It's one thing to say that small fishing ships, even coasters and keelboats, could be built without formal shipyard facilities. But as I understand it, most medieval European ships were clinker-built - so this would include not only longships and knarrs, but probably drakkars, cogs, and caravels too. Likely the roundship(?), galleon, and Khinasi ships are the only non-clinker ships out of the standard BR ship list (I don't know a whole lot about how dhouras, dhows, and zebecs were made IRL, I'm just assuming they weren't clinker-built).
    Clinker built ships include , knarrs, longships, drakkars, and maybe cogs (they were developed from clinker ships and were a bit of a mide point between clinker and non clinker ships).

    Longships could be up to around 100 feet long and 30 wide after that it became very difficult to join the planks and keep the boat sea worthy.

    Caravels are not clinker built.

    Wooden vessels can be either CARVEL BUILT or CLINKER BUILT. The latter method is sometimes known as LAPSTRAKE.

    In carvel built craft the ribs are set up in the right position on the keel and the planks are bent round them and fastened edge to edge so they lie flush with one another. Each single width of planking running the length of the vessel is known as a STRAKE. The strake nearest the keel is the GARBOARD STRAKE and the top one is the SHEER STRAKE. The sheer strake is usually strengthend by a GUNWALE, pronounced and sometimes written as gunnel (a WALE is any extra timber added as band outside the hull). The ends of each strake are fastened to a STEM POST to form the pointed bow and at the other end they can either be fastened to a STERN POST in the same way, making bow and stern similar (a DOUBLE-ENDER), or, more usually, they can be fastened to TRANSOMS, which are timbers running from side to side across the stern and fixed to the stern post. This gives a TRANSOM or SQUARE STERN. Other timbers going across the width in the bottom of the hull are known as FLOORS.

    In clinker built craft the keel and the stem and stern posts are set up and the planks are fitted without an internal framework. Starting with the garboard strake each plank overlaps the one below and the two are fastened through the overlap. When the planking is complete the ribs are fitted inside the hull and fastened to the planking. Thus it is the complete converse of the carvel process. Generally speaking the early carvel built ships were used in the Mediterranean countries while northern Europe, where the saw was not yet known, built clinker ships which required less precision in cutting timber but were limited in size. Later all big ships were carvel built.

    Clinker built ships have a shallow draft tend to be smaller than caravel constructed ships.
    MORNINGSTAR

  6. #6
    Birthright Developer irdeggman's Avatar
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    I have to go with Osprey on this one. What size are we talking about? IMO it not necesarilly the type of constructin but its complexity. Small fishing boats (i.e., those with no BR cargo capacity) are definitely small and wouldn't require a shipyard while larger ships (i.e., those with a cargo capacity) would. Ships in the 100 ft by 30 ft range are into the level of complexity that woud, IMO, require a shipyard.

    If you force me to vote for all then its all, but I don't like that choice.
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  7. #7
    Birthright Developer irdeggman's Avatar
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    I'm closing this poll.

    Here are the results, pretty much inconclusive.


    what do you require to make clinker built ships?
    A shipyard? [ 2 ] [22.22%]
    A port? [ 2 ] [22.22%]
    Nothing? [ 1 ] [11.11%]
    A province of a certain size? [ 3 ] [33.33%]
    Other? [ 1 ] [11.11%]
    Total Votes: 9
    Duane Eggert

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