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  1. #1
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    Hi everyone,

    I'm starting a new campaign this weekend in Alamie, and we're going to go low-magic. It's not domain play, just an adventure setting.

    Anyway, I was hoping you had some suggestions for me about awarding treasure in a low-magic campaign. I'm used to the forgotten realms (monsters are piñatas that explode into bags of gold and +1 items) or Ravenloft (treasure? what treasure? not even regular treasure&#33 but not something in between.

    What kind of things might you award that are still rewards? I'm out of my element here, but I don't want to blow it by giving too much magic away early on. I will probably give out potions now and then, and maybe a magical weapon after a quest or as some sort of major reward. I could give more money, but then, what would you do with it?

    Also, any suggestions on handling craft items besides just disallowing those feats is appreciated. Finally, I'm sure you've already talked about this, but you guys are full of fresh ideas, so I appreciate those as well as links from the sages of the board.
    Carpe DM

  2. #2
    Birthright Developer irdeggman's Avatar
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    Suggestions invovling the market value:

    Increase the market value of magic items -
    Increase by 25-30% (the approx increase from 2nd ed)
    Double or triple the cost (from Complete Warrior for low magic settings)

    I'd keep the feats but by applying the above the amount of items created becomes less. I would also make an exception for scrolls and potions (keep them at normal costs).

    When the market value is changed this increases the monetary costs for creating as well as the exp cost for creating items.
    Duane Eggert

  3. #3
    Senior Member RaspK_FOG's Avatar
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    If you are willing to make a little addition to your game, I would suggest that you add masterpiece items to your setting: masterpiece weapons grant a +2 enhancement bonus on attack rolls, masterpiece suits of armour and shields have their armour check penalties reduced by 2. Masterpiece weapons cost an additional 600 gp, while masterpiece suits of armour and shields cost an additional 300 gp. These values are similar to values applied on masterwork items, but replace them in a sense. The Craft check DC to "make the masterpiece component" (<_< Foolish mechanic if you ask me... The same applies on master work components for my part&#33 is 25.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Osprey's Avatar
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    I use te idea that dwarves in the BRCS have, similar to what RaspK mentioned. Superior Masterwork items, though mine are only +1 mundane enhancement bonus to attack and damage for weapons, armor is -2 armor check, +1 max Dex bonus to AC, and -5% spell failure.

    For Oriental Adventures I had a 3rd grade, Legendary Masterwork, which I allowed for katanas only (granting a +2 natural enhancement bonus), but the idea can easily be imported to Birthright. However, I&#39;d put the Craft DC at 30+ for items like this...

    Remember, low magic doesn&#39;t have to mean low-level craftsmen. Having some really amazing pieces of craftsmanship can make for a flavor-rich game that doesn&#39;t have to have magical gizmos pouring out your ears.

    Osprey

  5. #5
    Don&#39;t forget that rewards can be intangible as well as tangible. Favors, information, and the building of relationships can all be good rewards for good player performance. They could also give the players in game effects as well.

    For example, a player might do a good turn for someone who turns out to be an economic/organizational/military/etc genius. This individual is so grateful that they offer to help the player out on one occassion, possibly giving them a bonus a Build Trade Routes action, reducing the cost of building a castle, or giving the benefit of a military feat during a climactic battle. Even better, if the Player plays his cards right and cultivates a relationship with this individual he might be persuaded to come aboard full time as a (paid) exceptional advisor. See the book of regency for information on advisors.

    Information is also a good reward. It can be something as simple as trite as learning the possible location of the map to some fabulous magical treasure (thus making the final acquisition of said treasure all the more special because it was dragged out over several adventures), to finding out what signals are used by the Ghoerean army in battle (of course Ghoere would have to change them later, but give the PCs an advantage in a battle or two).

    Relationships are very important in BR because the game is so political. PCs development of hirelings and random NPCs into trusted lieutenants, advisors, heirs and the like can be very rewarding to players, and make the game as a whole more enjoyable.

    Finally, consider giving regency points. The Book of Regency gives an pseudo-example (not neccessarily applicable to 3E) with the King Errant kit. But you should consider rewarding over the top heroics with a 1-4 regency points for the respect and awe that they earn the regent among his subjects ("The Baron fought off what?&#33; In his robe and slippers?&#33; With one hand tied behind his back?&#33; WOW&#33;").

  6. #6
    Senior Member RaspK_FOG's Avatar
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    Sorry for that: erroneous "post reply"... Can it be deleted?

  7. #7
    Senior Member RaspK_FOG's Avatar
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    Originally posted by "Osprey"+--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE ("Osprey")</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I use te idea that dwarves in the BRCS have, similar to what RaspK mentioned. Superior Masterwork items, though mine are only +1 mundane enhancement bonus to attack and damage for weapons, armor is -2 armor check, +1 max Dex bonus to AC, and -5% spell failure.[/b]

    I really liked that "only" part... :P

    Originally posted by "Osprey"+--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE ("Osprey")</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>For Oriental Adventures I had a 3rd grade, Legendary Masterwork, which I allowed for katanas only (granting a +2 natural enhancement bonus), but the idea can easily be imported to Birthright. However, I&#39;d put the Craft DC at 30+ for items like this...[/b]

    Actually, I generally like the idea of unique craftsmanship potential. Standard rules do not allow for such weapons, but adding serrated and laminated weapons to your game can be benficial; the same applies to bodkin arrows, etc.
    • Serrated slashing or piercing weapons have their critical threat range increased by 1 after all other adjustments have been made; so, a serrated greatsword would have a critical of "18-20/×3", while a serrated keen greataxe would have a critical of "18-20/×4". Costs 600 gp. Component Craft check DC: 20.
    • Laminated steel slashing or piercing weapons have their critical damage multiplier increased by 1, deal 1 additional point of damage, and have their hardness increased by 5. Thus, a laminated steel longsword has a critical of "19-20/×3" and a damage rating of "1d8+1 Slashing", while a laminated steel scythe has a critical of "×5" and a damage rating of "2d4+1 Slashing & Piercing". Costs 900 gp. Component Craft check DC: 25.
    • Serrated and laminated steel increase the cost of items that have additional such components dramatically: for each such component, including a masterwork or masterpiece component, add their costs and multiply that by their number. For example, a serrated, laminated steel, masterpiece longsword would cost:
      (600 + 900 + 600 + 15) × 3 gp = 2.115 × 3 gp = 6.345 gp.
    • Intricate weapons or suits of armour or shields cost an additional 1.000 gp for having an artistic value.
    • Jeweled weapons or suits of armour or shields cost an additional amount of gp according to the cost of the gems that are embeded on them.
    • Bodkin arrows allow for an effectively lower AC; count the target&#39;s armour, shield, and natural armour bonuses to AC as if lower by 1, or 2 for master work items, when shot at with bodkin arrows.
    • Costs should be considered accordingly, but not get lower than the ones appropriate for masterwork items (which they all are); a good test would be to judge how effective an item is going to be and compare it to magic items that do the same thing...

    <!--QuoteBegin-"Osprey"
    @
    Remember, low magic doesn&#39;t have to mean low-level craftsmen. Having some really amazing pieces of craftsmanship can make for a flavor-rich game that doesn&#39;t have to have magical gizmos pouring out your ears.[/quote]
    Couldn&#39;t put it better...


    Really good ideas, Bearcat&#33; Pretty sweet examples.

    <!--QuoteBegin-"Bearcat"

    Finally, consider giving regency points. The Book of Regency gives an pseudo-example (not neccessarily applicable to 3E) with the King Errant kit. But you should consider rewarding over the top heroics with a 1-4 regency points for the respect and awe that they earn the regent among his subjects ("The Baron fought off what?&#33; In his robe and slippers?&#33; With one hand tied behind his back?&#33; WOW&#33;").[/quote]
    Now, that last one cracked me up&#33; :lol:

    I think I will put my Weapon Master prestige class up here soon as an idea of what use mundane treasure such as the one above can be.

  8. #8
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    Even items made of special materials are valuable to low level creatures.


    Consider a silvered weapon, or even a masterwork silvered weapon. Those come in handy if rumors of werecreatures from out of the 5 Peaks a floating around. Or cold iron if the Shadow creatures are lurking about.


    Old mithril chain shirts or chainmail. Maybe a little history to the item as it was taken from raiders that were travelling to join the Manslayer&#39;s band. Or a gift to a human ranger for acts of generosity to the Sidhe.

    Weapons that are not locally made. If one of the players is an archer, finding a mighty Khinasi composite longbow would put the local archers to shame.

  9. #9
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    You can also give them keys to treasures. Just as the map was suggested, they could find a ring which unlocks the door to a cavern, inside which the treasure lies.

    Or you could have them find a signet ring of some lord or another, which would help persuade pesky guards that they are good people and should be allowed to enter the palace.

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by camelotcrusade@Jun 11 2004, 03:33 PM
    Hi everyone,

    I&#39;m starting a new campaign this weekend in Alamie, and we&#39;re going to go low-magic. It&#39;s not domain play, just an adventure setting.

    Anyway, I was hoping you had some suggestions for me about awarding treasure in a low-magic campaign. I&#39;m used to the forgotten realms (monsters are piñatas that explode into bags of gold and +1 items) or Ravenloft (treasure? what treasure? not even regular treasure&#33 but not something in between.

    What kind of things might you award that are still rewards? I&#39;m out of my element here, but I don&#39;t want to blow it by giving too much magic away early on. I will probably give out potions now and then, and maybe a magical weapon after a quest or as some sort of major reward. I could give more money, but then, what would you do with it?

    Also, any suggestions on handling craft items besides just disallowing those feats is appreciated. Finally, I&#39;m sure you&#39;ve already talked about this, but you guys are full of fresh ideas, so I appreciate those as well as links from the sages of the board.
    I use Action Points from Unearthed Arcana. Every time a character attains a new level of experience (including 1st level), she gets a number of APs equal to 5 plus half her level (rounded down). Also, I reward APs as part of bonus rewards for good roleplaying.
    An AP is worth 100 gp per level, so this really cuts down on the total amount of treasure I have to hand out to keep the PCs on par with their character level.
    I seriously recommend this system to everyone, especially if you&#39;re running a Br campaign.
    <span style='color:darkgray'>&quot;I like to be passionate and sincere, but I also like to have fun and act like a dork... Geeks unite.&quot;
    &#160;</span>&#160;<span style='color:brightgray'>&#160;&#160;—Kurt Cobain</span>

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