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  1. #1
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    I have a D&D-compatable e-book that I'm wanting to publish, titled Ages of Arms & Armor. It is a comprehensive, play-tested, and balanced set of alternative combat rules for use with 3rd Edition D&D. (I will update it for 3.5, once those rulebooks come out.)

    Damage reduction for armor is at the core of these rules. I've seen many posts on other message boards requesting and discussing this, but no one has yet come up with a comprehensive, as well as a thoroughly play-tested and balanced, set of rules incorporating armor DR into 3E D&D.

    Ages of Arms & Armor is designed primarily for low- to mid-level (1st to 10th level) campaigns that have a more realistic and historical feel to them, while still keeping the heroic fantasy aspects of D&D. The Birthright and the Kingdom of Kalamar campaign settings are ideal for this. The various "mythical-historical" sourcebooks from Avalanche press are also fitting.

    (Myself, I think the Birthright campaign setting is fantastic! I have just about every Birthright publication ever produced by TSR. I believe Ages of Arms & Armor is a great way to enhance a Birthright campaign.)

    Ages of Arms & Armor is similar in purpose to Ken Hood's "Grim-n-Gritty" rules, only the former is neither as grim nor as gritty as the latter, and the former is much broader in scope. Ages of Arms & Armor is comprehensive, and it's all thoroughly play-tested and balanced. Above all, these rules are highly playable, and they maintain the abstract and heroic features of D&D combat. (This is NOT an attempt to make 3rd Edition D&D combat more like that in GURPS or RoleMaster or Harn.)

    Although these rules have been thoroughly play-tested and balanced, I'm looking for further play-testers, those outside my gaming circle. (I'm especially interested in getting other DMs involved in this.) Also, I'm looking for someone to illustrate the e-book. (Mostly what I'm looking for are a few pieces depicting various fantasy-Medieval-Renaissance weapons and armor, and combatant using those weapons and armor against each other.)

    If you're interested in getting involved in this project, either as a play-tester or an illustrator, e-mail me. I'll send you a preview copy of Ages of Arms & Armor.

    azlan@attbi.com

  2. #2
    Birthright Developer irdeggman's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Azlan

    I have a D&D-compatable e-book that I'm wanting to publish, titled Ages of Arms & Armor. It is a comprehensive, play-tested, and balanced set of alternative combat rules for use with 3rd Edition D&D. (I will update it for 3.5, once those rulebooks come out.)

    Damage reduction for armor is at the core of these rules. I've seen many posts on other message boards requesting and discussing this, but no one has yet come up with a comprehensive, as well as a thoroughly play-tested and balanced, set of rules incorporating armor DR into 3E D&D.

    Ages of Arms & Armor is designed primarily for low- to mid-level (1st to 10th level) campaigns that have a more realistic and historical feel to them, while still keeping the heroic fantasy aspects of D&D. The Birthright and the Kingdom of Kalamar campaign settings are ideal for this. The various "mythical-historical" sourcebooks from Avalanche press are also fitting.

    (Myself, I think the Birthright campaign setting is fantastic! I have just about every Birthright publication ever produced by TSR. I believe Ages of Arms & Armor is a great way to enhance a Birthright campaign.)

    Ages of Arms & Armor is similar in purpose to Ken Hood's "Grim-n-Gritty" rules, only the former is neither as grim nor as gritty as the latter, and the former is much broader in scope. Ages of Arms & Armor is comprehensive, and it's all thoroughly play-tested and balanced. Above all, these rules are highly playable, and they maintain the abstract and heroic features of D&D combat. (This is NOT an attempt to make 3rd Edition D&D combat more like that in GURPS or RoleMaster or Harn.)

    Although these rules have been thoroughly play-tested and balanced, I'm looking for further play-testers, those outside my gaming circle. (I'm especially interested in getting other DMs involved in this.) Also, I'm looking for someone to illustrate the e-book. (Mostly what I'm looking for are a few pieces depicting various fantasy-Medieval-Renaissance weapons and armor, and combatant using those weapons and armor against each other.)

    If you're interested in getting involved in this project, either as a play-tester or an illustrator, e-mail me. I'll send you a preview copy of Ages of Arms & Armor.

    azlan@attbi.com
    Congratulations and good luck on your project. One thing to note though is the moment you change the armor class system to a damage reduction one, which is used in many non-D&D d20 products, it is no longer "compatable" with D&D. The present armor class system and the magic system are two of the things that separate D&D from other d20 products. Once you deviate from them you no longer follow the "core rules" and per the OGL and other licensing requisites it is no longer "D&D".

    I'm not saying that a damage reduction system for armor class is a bad idea, I think it really a good one. I'm only saying that it is no longer "D&D" but instead a medieval fantasy role playing game instead.:)
    Duane Eggert

  3. #3
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    Originally posted by irdeggman
    Congratulations and good luck on your project. One thing to note though is the moment you change the armor class system to a damage reduction one, which is used in many non-D&D d20 products, it is no longer "compatable" with D&D. The present armor class system and the magic system are two of the things that separate D&D from other d20 products. Once you deviate from them you no longer follow the "core rules" and per the OGL and other licensing requisites it is no longer "D&D".
    Technically (or should I say, "legally"?) you are correct.

    As I said, Ages of Arms & Armor is designed primarily for low- to mid-level campaigns that have a more realistic and historical feel to them, while still keeping the heroic fantasy aspects of D&D. Thus, Ages of Arms & Armor is ideal for the Birthright and the Kingdom of Kalamar campaign settings. Above all, these alternative rules for combat are highly playable, and they maintain the abstract and heroic features of D&D combat. (These rules are not an attempt to make 3rd Edition D&D combat more like that of GURPS, RoleMaster, or Harn.)

    Does that mean you're no longer playing D&D if you use Ages of Arms & Armor with D&D? Well, I guess it depends on your viewpoint. After all, Ages of Arms & Armor is really just as set of published "house rules". And there are many, many D&D campaigns out there that use a considerable amount of house rules. Is what they're playing no longer D&D as well?

    Really, it all depends on what house rules a group is using, and what viewpoint you tend to take on this matter.

  4. #4
    Birthright Developer irdeggman's Avatar
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    Azlan, several things to consider:


    How will magical enchantments (i.e., enhancements) work? Will they add to the "base" AC of the armor or will they add to damage reduction? {This one will have a major impact on other aspects of the game.}

    Will there be an increase in AC at all? If not then the concept of someone getting better at hitting someone else as they gain levels sort of fails. Other d20 systems utilize a defense bonus system that increase with class level. What this does is make it harder to be hit as a character gains levels, the damage reduction of armor (also present in some of these products - see Star Wars (revised rules) for instance) is a separate thing with armor adding no AC bonus. {This one could also have potential major impact on the "core rules" class systems.}

    How will monsters be handled? Does natural armor translate into a damage reduction? {Another potential wide ranging impact on the "core rules", although this one probably is the easiest to handle making it "similar" to how armor is handled. It would just require substantial "rewriting" of the monster manuals.}

    Will the damage reduction apply to magic as well as "normal" attacks?


    This just sort of proves the point that even a "minor, limited" change can have wide ranging effects on a system. I just wish that the "powers that be" at Wizards would drop the "untouchable" concept of armor that has been maintaind in D&D (but dropped in other WotC games). As I mentioned previously Star Wars using defense bonus and damage reduction, Wheel of Time and d20 Modern both use defense bonuses that are class level based. Wheel of Time has defense bonuses and armor bonuses not stack, Star Wars there is nor bonus provided by armor so they don't stack and d20 Modern has defense bonus and armor bonus (equipment bonus) stack.




    Just to point out that I did say I thought it was a good idea, or at least implied that by saying I didn't think it was a bad idea.


    I'm not saying that a damage reduction system for armor class is a bad idea, I think it really a good one. I'm only saying that it is no longer "D&D" but instead a medieval fantasy role playing game instead.:)
    Duane Eggert

  5. #5
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    All of your questions and concerns have indeed been addressed in Ages of Arms & Armor. As I said, these rules are comprehensive.

    I've been working on these alternative combat rules for the past two to three years, shortly after 3rd Edition came out. (I've DM'ed many, many campaigns, ever since 1st Edition AD&D, and I've gamemastered lots of other RPG's, including GURPS, Fantasy Hero, Pendragon, and Ars Magica.) My goal was to make combat more historical and realistic, while maintaining the abstract and heroic aspects of D&D combat. I wanted the Ages of Arms & Armor alternative combat rules to be comprehensive, balanced, and playable. To ensure this, for the past 2-3 years I've done much play-testing using Ages of Arms & Armor with my various groups and campaigns, refining and expanding the rules between campaigns.

    Check out a copy of Ages of Arms & Armor, and see for yourself... !

    :)

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