PDA

View Full Version : Divesting Holdings



Robert Harper
11-16-1997, 05:04 AM
The rulebook states that divesting holdings causes losses of Regency and
sometimes bloodline strength (p.48).

Do DM's generally rule or the rules provide that this applies always, even
if a Regent is voluntarily passing control of a holding to another allied
Regent?

__________________________________________________ _________________
| |
| We ask ourselves if there is a God, how can this happen? |
| Better to ask, if there is a God, must it be sane? |
| |
| Lucien LaCroix |
|_________________________________________________ __________________|

prtr02@scorpion.nspco.co
11-17-1997, 05:10 PM
I would not use the suggestion to not reduce bloodline strength when a province
is lost. The bloodline strength (to me anyway) doesn't just represent the "god
essence" flowing in their veins. It also represents what they've done with it.


If your house rules a domain, and rules it well, its bloodline strength increases. The lines strength increases with its fame and its name is etched in the histories. If a
house loses its domain, its bloodline whithers and is forgotten. Lots of great stories
can revolve around either restoring a line to its former glory or living up to the
expectations or the people given the fame of your ancestors.

Take the good with the bad. If you can increase your bloodline with RP, you can lose
lose it too.

Randax

Neil Barnes
11-19-1997, 10:01 AM
On Mon, 17 Nov 1997, Randall W. Porter@6550 wrote:
> I would not use the suggestion to not reduce bloodline strength when a
> province is lost. The bloodline strength (to me anyway) doesn't just
> represent the "god essence" flowing in their veins. It also
> represents what they've done with it.
>
> If your house rules a domain, and rules it well, its bloodline strength
> increases. The lines strength increases with its fame and its name is
> etched in the histories. If a house loses its domain, its bloodline
> whithers and is forgotten.

I'm not sure I'd strip Bloodstrength from a PC for merely loosing
provinces - often rulers loose their realms to superior forces in ways
that don't reflect on the ruler themselves. I suppose I'm thinking of
Aragorn in the LotRs here.

I'd probably strip RPs more for blatant mismanagment - getting involved
in futile, inconclusive wars; bankrupting your country; killing off
levies, that sort of thing.

neil

Mark A Vandermeulen
11-19-1997, 03:33 PM
On Wed, 19 Nov 1997, Neil Barnes wrote:

> I'm not sure I'd strip Bloodstrength from a PC for merely loosing
> provinces - often rulers loose their realms to superior forces in ways
> that don't reflect on the ruler themselves. I suppose I'm thinking of
> Aragorn in the LotRs here.
>
> I'd probably strip RPs more for blatant mismanagment - getting involved
> in futile, inconclusive wars; bankrupting your country; killing off
> levies, that sort of thing.

From the other perspective, I tend to award characters who increase their
renown and political standing with 1-4 points of BL strength, so I have
little problem with applying penalties to their failures. For example, in
my game, the Baron of Roesone recently won a battle against Ghoere, who is
a heriditary enemy of Roesone. As a consequence, I gave him an increase of
3 BL points, to indicate his increase in standing in comparison to other
rulers around him, as evidenced by his success in battle. On the other
hand, my guilder character recently lost a contest of espionage against
Orthien Tane (who has become sort of the "master of all evil" in our
campaign and is his character's hereditary enemy) and as a result lost 1
point of BL strength.
Some other things I award BL points for: creating a new province,
becoming the official guild, temple or law holder of a realm (for example,
the guilder, who owns the Spider River Traders, recently negotiated a
treaty with Aerenwe to become the sole guild in the country, one of the
results of which was that he recieved 2 points in BL strength). Creating a
new battle or realm spell (1 point), creating a new troop unit (required
the Build action to create a War Academy in the country), for gaining a
new vassal, for defeating a minor awnsheighlein (but not killing him, i.e.
he escaped, but his plans were foiled; if they had killed him, they
would have gotten more). I look at bloodline strength as a sort of
composite measure of your renoun among the people of the land, as well as
your political standing among other scions. So far it's worked pretty
well.

Mark VanderMeulen
vander+@pitt.edu